14 Different Sugars: Are They Good or Bad?

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by Sil Pancho

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10.26.2021

There are different types of sugar and sweetness. Sugar is a carbohydrate, which comes in different forms, such as cane sugar, corn syrup, or molasses. Sweetness is different for everyone, but we can mostly agree that the sweeter, the better! It’s important to find different types of sweetness because you can be sure that there isn’t anything in your food that you don’t want in your body and these different types of sugars allow us to indulge from time to time without doing too much damage our health.

To make healthier sweet choices, it’s important to know what different types of sugars there are out there so you know what exactly it is you should avoid. Here are different types of sugar and their corresponding sweetness:

1) Brown Sugar

Ranked as a 9 on the glycemic index scale, brown sugar has more calories than white sugar, 16 grams per tablespoon. White sugar only has about 15 calories per tablespoon. Although brown sugar has some nutritional benefits over refined white table sugars, such as containing minerals like calcium, magnesium, and iron, it is still classified as a refined carbohydrate.

2) Cane Sugar

Asked as a 10 on the glycemic index scale, cane sugar has about 15 calories per tablespoon, just like white table and brown sugars. Cane sugar is different than processed white sugar because it’s minimally processed. Naturally occurring nutrients such as vitamins and minerals are left intact in making cane sugar.

3) Coconut Palm Sugar

Ranked as an 11 on the glycemic index scale, coconut palm sugar has 16 grams of carbs for every 1 tablespoon serving. Although higher than other sugars listed here, you can at least be sure that there aren’t any added chemicals or preservatives to worry about.

4) Corn Syrup

Ranked as a 20 on the glycemic index scale, corn syrup is different from other sugars because it is a processed sugar made from corn starch. Turning the corn into syrup creates glucose which spikes your blood sugar levels just like table sugars do. Despite being different in its production, corn syrup has about the same number of calories as cane and brown sugars, with 15 grams per tablespoon.

5) Date sugar

Ranked as a 12 on the glycemic index scale, date sugar contains 30 grams of carbs for one tablespoon serving and about 60 total calories when added up if you add 1 tablespoon to your drink or food. However, date sugar is different from most types of sugars because it is minimally processed and contains different nutrients that other sugars don’t contain.

6) Fructose

As a 19 on the glycemic index scale, fructose is different from most table sugars because it’s not made up of glucose and sucrose like table sugar normally is. Although different from regular sugar, fructose has been shown to increase triglycerides in your body, leading to heart disease over time if you have too much of it.

7) Fruit Sugar

Ranked as a 9 on the glycemic index scale, fruit sugar has about 15 calories per tablespoon, just like cane and brown sugars do. Fruit sugar also has different benefits than white table sugars, such as containing different vitamins and minerals that help regulate blood pressure levels or maintain different types of cells in your body.

8) Glucose

Ranked as a 100 on the glycemic index scale, glucose is different from other sugars because it is a component of most fruits and vegetables. Although different from most different types of sugar, glucose also converts to energy quickly, which spikes blood sugar levels. For many years, people have used different types of sugar for baking instead of white table sugars because glucose has been shown to give more volume to baked goods such as bread and pastries.

9) High-Fructose Corn Syrup

Ranked as a 20 on the glycemic index scale, high fructose corn syrup is different than most table sugars that you see because it’s with corn starch instead of a cane or beet sugar. Unlike glucose, fructose is different because it converts to energy slower, so people use different types of sugar in baking instead of white table sugars. Although different from most different types of Sugar, high-fructose corn syrup is dangerous for your health because it’s been linked with different types of cancers.

10) Honey

Ranked as a 55 on the glycemic index scale, honey has about 17 grams of carbs per tablespoon and more calories than other sugars listed here at 63 total calories per tablespoon serving. Like fruit sugars, honey can have different benefits over other types of sugar, such as improving memory or protecting cardiovascular health if you drink it during exercise routines.

11) Maple Syrup

Ranked as a 54 on the glycemic index scale, maple syrup contains different sugars that do different things once they enter your body. With about 14 grams of carbs per tablespoon serving and 60 total calories, if you add 1 tablespoon to your drink or food, maple syrup can be helpful for certain medical conditions such as diabetes because it also has manganese, zinc, B vitamins, calcium, and iron.

12) Molasses

As a 54 on the glycemic index scale, molasses are different from most different types of sugar because they contain different nutrients that help regulate different functions in your body. Since molasses contain iron and copper, which helps produce different enzymes in your body, there have been studies done recently showing how people who have anemia can improve their different symptoms such as different heart problems or different fatigue problems through different types of sugar molasses.

13.) Table Sugar

Table sugar is the most common form of sweetener in many people’s diets today. It comes from two different sources – beets or sugar cane – and can be processed into white granulated table sugar, which is very fine, or brown sugars. Both white granulated table sugars and brown sugars have added molasses content to make them taste better. Still, brown sugars tend to have richer flavor due to having a higher molasses content.

14.) Raw Sugar

Raw sugar is different than refined white sugar because raw sugars are unprocessed cane sugars. It’s different from brown sugar because raw sugars don’t have molasses added to them, making them lighter in color and slightly less rich in flavor. Raw sugars contain different levels of minerals than refined white table sugar does, but both types of sugar contain about the same number of calories per teaspoon.

Although different sugars can be beneficial if you know what type to use and when there’s been a lot of controversy over the past few years about whether different types of sugar cause weight gain which is why it’s important to always measure how much you’re eating

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